The Dolomites

Which mountain range is located in northeastern Italy?

And the answer is: the Dolomites.

As a range in the northern Italian Alps, the Dolomites take their name from a type of carbonate rock. During World War I, the front line between the Italian and Austro-Hungarian forces ran through the Dolomites.

The Dolomites are one of the most impressive mountain ranges in the world. Their immense peaks, sheer cliffs and narrow valleys comprise some of the most breathtaking views accessible to the human eye. In fact, UNESCO describes the Dolomites as one of the most attractive ranges in the world. Their pinnacles, spires and towers in contrast with plateaus and foothills create a varied and wonderful landscape.  

This beautiful landscape was also the site of intense battle, however. As the border between Austria and Italy, the Dolomites were a spot of treacherous warfare during World War I. Both sides had to deal with extreme temperatures, high altitudes and the instability of the mountains themselves. Today, tunnels and other imperfections created by this warfare remain part of the landscape.

Fun Fact!

The Dolomites are home to an ancient, largely untouched culture. The Ladin people have called this region home since around 5 B.C. and have managed to preserve many aspects of their traditional life and culture. Through two World Wars and many attempts at delegitimization, this culture continues to be known for their fine craftsmanship and peaceful way of life.

Want to experience the magic of the Dolomites firsthand? Check out the drone video below:

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