Which member of The Beatles was the last to join the band?
And the answer: Ringo Starr.    
Photo credit: public domain. 

Born Richard Starkey, Ringo Starr replaced The Beatles' original drummer Pete Best in 1962 after leaving his band Rory Storm and the Hurricanes.

Enigmatic and charismatic Starr charmed his way into the Beatles with his impeccable timing and compositional style of percussion. Interestingly, though, when Starr replaced Best as The Beatles' new drummer, some fans were furious. At Starr's debut performance in Liverpool, fans began to chant "Ringo out, Pete in!" alongside other (perhaps more harsh) words of discouragement. Little did they know, Starr on the drums would take The Beatles to unprecedented heights of fame.

As the fans soon came to realize, Starr's style of percussion elevated the group sound tenfold. Rather than sticking to the standard rock drum beats which dominated the earlier part of The Beatles' release history, Starr created new and innovative patterns for each song. This technique held up quite well overseas, as Starr quickly rose to become a favored member among American audiences. Records from artists such as Lorne Green, Bonnie Jo Mason and others began to specifically call upon Starr for inspiration, naming tracks anything from "Ringo I Love You" to just simply "Ringo."

Oddly enough, though, Starr's contributions often go unrecognized by Beatles fans today, as the spotlight on Paul McCartney and George Harrison often outshines the contributions of late-coming drummer. Yet, Starr's landmark drumming in such songs as “Come Together,” “Day Tripper,” “Rain,” “Ticket to Ride,” “Tomorrow Never Knows,” or his own “It Don’t Come Easy” confirms, Ringo Starr is a quiet man with massively large talent.

Check out Starr's drumming in action below.



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