Alfred Hitchcock's Oscar for Best Picture

What's the only film directed by Alfred Hitchcock that won an Oscar for Best Picture?

And the answer is: Rebecca.

From the 1940 film Rebecca, directed by Alfred Hitchcock: Mrs. de Winter (left, Joan Fontaine) with Mrs. Danvers (Judith Anderson)

Released in 1940, the romantic psychological thriller stars Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine, and received eleven Oscar nominations. It won two awards for Best Picture and Best Cinematography, and is the only film directed by Hitchcock to win for Best Picture.

"Master of Suspense" Alfred Hitchcock directed over 50 feature films in a nearly six decade career. As one of the most influential and extensively studied filmmakers, Hitchcock is known for a variety of titles in addition to the highly-acclaimed thriller Rebecca, including The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934 and again in 1956), Rear Window (1954), Vertigo (1958), North by Northwest (1959), Psycho (1960), and The Birds (1963).

Today, the name Hitchcock tends to evoke several expectations in an audience: great chills, striking dark comedy, and eccentric characterization. According to interviews with his actors, Hitchcock was often oblique with his direction, achieving his desired effect through subtle manipulation to his actors or the scene itself. However unconventional, the filmmaker's tendencies paid off handsomely, leading many actors on to Oscar-winning performances. He even went so far as to coin a "Hitchcockian" style, that includes the use of camera movement to mimic a person's gaze, turning viewers into voyeurs, and framing shots to maximize anxiety and fear.

Did you know?

In at least 39 of his films, Hitchcock himself entered in the scene in a short and often subtle cameo performance. As audience members began to pick up on the prankster director, Hitchcock began to have to structure the cameo early in the film as to avoid distraction from the plot.  

Watch the trailer for Hitchcock's Vertigo (1958) below.


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